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Home > News > Making Daily Instruction Relevant and Memorable

Making Daily Instruction Relevant and Memorable

Date: Thursday, July 13, 2006Author: by: Kristina M. Swann, PCI author

Making Daily Instruction Relevant and Memorable
As educators, we know that students learn best when the instruction is relevant to their lives. We also know that students must spend time reviewing things they have learned in order to reinforce that knowledge and make it a part of them. For example, you can teach a great lesson on how to write a paragraph, but if the students never practice writing, they will not remember what they have learned. One of the best ways to inject relevance and review into your classroom every day is using a daily warm-up.

English
English classes are the easiest place to make learning relevant to students’ lives because they can write about their experiences, thoughts, and feelings in a daily journal. Make the daily warm-up a time for reflection and a time to review skills. Have students write their journal entries in paragraph form. Check for a topic sentence, three detail sentences, and a conclusion in every journal entry.

Math
Pique students’ interest in solving word problems by substituting their names and activities into premade story problems for the daily warm-up. As students practice skills necessary for performing well on standardized tests, they will enjoy solving word problems with the names and hobbies of their classmates in them. In one school year, you will be able to use each student’s name at least once. Save story problems in a file folder and switch out the names every year!

Social Studies
There are several web sites that will tell you what happened in history on each day. For your daily warm-up, write the event, invention, or birthday of a historical figure on the board and ask students to write in a journal about that subject. What would life be like today if the event had never happened, if the invention had not been invented, or if that person had never been born?

Science
Several web sites are available that will tell you what happened in science on each day. For your daily warm-up, write the discovery, invention, event, or birthday of an important member of the scientific community on the board. Ask students to write in a journal about that subject. What would life be like today if the discovery had never been found, the invention had not been invented, the event had never happened, or if that person had never been born?

If you are seeking more daily warm-up ideas, PCI’s Basic Paragraph Practice[/URL] anSolving Word Problems with Pictures[/URL] are great ways to reinforce knowledge in your English or math class.